Ariens Blog

The latest from Ariens

Ariens® Introduces Kawasaki® Engine Options on APEX, IKON XL and IKON X Zero-Turn Mowers

11/28/2016 6:00:00 AM

​For its 2017 lineup, Ariens® will offer Kawasaki® engine options for the APEX, IKON XL and IKON X zero-turn mowers. This is the first time in several years that the brand has offered Kawasaki engines on their zero-turn line. 

The move comes as the brand has introduced several new and re-designed zero-turn solutions for homeowners over the past two years. In addition to a new brand look and logo, the brand’s lineup incorporates several innovative features that improve both efficiency and operator comfort. ​

Ariens Company Vice President of Marketing Matt Medden says that Kawasaki engines were selected because of their trust and preference among both homeowners and professionals alike. 

“Our Ariens line of zero-turn mowers were designed for homeowners, but we built them with many of the same features that commercial zero-turns incorporate,” said Medden. “Given the strong preference for Kawasaki in the commercial landscaping industry, we knew that we wanted to offer the same solution to our homeowners who want to buy the equipment that the pros use.”


 

Ariens will offer the Kawasaki FR V-Twin 24 HP engine on both the APEX 60-inch model and IKON XL 60-inch model, and the Kawasaki FR V-Twin 23 HP engine on the IKON X 52-inch model. The Ariens IKON X featuring the Kawasaki engine starts at a promotional price of $2,999 USD. 

The Ariens APEX and IKON XL models are available through authorized Ariens dealer only. The IKON X is available at both authorized Ariens dealers and at Home Depot locations across the country.  

For more information, visit www.ariens.com.  


 

8 Things to Do this Fall to Love your Landscape Next Spring

11/14/2016 6:00:00 AM

In partnership with the National Association of Landscape Professionals​, Ariens is providing its customers with a variety of lawncare tips. For more tips and tricks to achieving the perfect lawn, please visit www.loveyourlandscape.org​​. ​​​


Many homeowners believe that there is little yard maintenance to be done in the fall. Au contraire, DIYers! The investments you make in your lawn and landscape now will help determine the health and appearance of your property next spring. Check out these eight things to do this fall to love your landscape when the temperatures warm.
Feed your lawn for its long winter's nap. Northern lawns benefit from fall fertilization while the grass is still green but has slowed its growth, generally sometime around October, before the soil freezes. (Fertilizing after the ground freezes is not recommended.) In the mid-south, lawns benefit from late summer fertilization followed by a November application. Properly fertilized lawns will green up early next spring and need less fertilizer as temperatures warm. 

 
​​Winter weed woes. If you have a southern lawn, it will likely go dormant after the first couple of frosts. During the winter when it is brown and not growing, winter weeds can sprout and grow without competition. If they are not treated, a green cover of winter weeds will emerge in the spring, delaying recovery of the health and vibrancy of your lawn. Talk with a professional about an application to prevent weeds before they become a problem. ​​​  ​​​​

 
Bye-bye bare spots. Fall is absolutely the best time to seed thin or bare areas of your northern lawn. Seedlings will root better and be hardier next summer than if you delay this pro​​cess until spring.​​

 

 

 
Don't leave leaves behind. Don't let tree leaves smother your lawn during the long winter months. Ideally you can mulch them into the lawn with the help of a mower as that recycles the nutrients and organic matter they contain. If you have too many leaves, bagging them with a lawn mower and using them as mulch on plant beds or adding them to a compost pile are good alternatives. Be careful not to allow leaves to enter storm drains or waterways.

 
Prune plants. Fall and winter are good times to cut back overgrown woody plant material. Often called "hard pruning" or "rejuvenation pruning," this practice removes dead branches and those branches that are growing back into the plant's canopy or rubbing against other branches. This practice can also be used to reduce plant size and to create new stronger buds in hedges that are repeatedly sheared during the growing season.​​

 
Take care of your equipment and it will take care of you. Before you put away your mowing equipment for the winter, prepare it for spring by running it out of fuel. Fuel left in equipment will spoil and may form gum on key engine parts that will prevent the equipment from starting. Rather than leaving gasoline in the gas can all winter, put the gas in your car and purchase fresh gas for your mower when you take it out next spring. Removing the spark plug and placing a tablespoon of oil in the head before replacing the plug is another good step before packing the mower up for winter. If your old mower is on its last leg, now might be a good time to check out sale prices at area stores.​​

 
Planting bulbs for spring. If you live in the north, crocus, daffodils, and tulips are the first flowers of spring. Prepare for their arrival by planting bulbs now so they will be conditioned by cold winter soils for flowering. These flowers are most dramatic when planted in masses. Color combinations are widely varied; however, don't be tempted to create a rainbow of colors from the bulbs. One or two strong colors make a powerful impact statement. ​​

 
Get professional help. Renew your lawn and landscape care contract. Although most lawn agreements renew automatically, some states require an annual renewal process. Many companies that are planning for next season may offer special pricing to continuing customers willing to recommit early. If you don't already work with a professional, it is a good time to research companies and select the right partner to help you love your outdoor living space.​​

Winter is coming! When will you see the first flakes in your area?

11/8/2016 6:00:00 AM

​​​Though many parts of the country have experienced a rather mild fall, it's inevitable that winter is coming. ​Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric A​dministration (NOAA)​ has mapped its prediction for when you will see snow in your area.

​The colored dots on the map below show the date by which there's a 50 per cent chance that at least 0.1 inch of snow will have fallen, based on each location's snowfall history from 1981-2010.


 
According to an article posted by DailyMail, "Weather.com explains that there are three basic ingredients needed for snow. The air needs to be moist, it needs to be below freezing, and the air needs to rise in order to turn moisture into snowflakes. Being close to large bodies of water can help bring about snow fall. But the places that get the most snow are usually those that consistently get cold, rising air, such as in the northern latitudes.The NOAA map shows how these three ingredients are combining on a regional level."​

 
Is your area expecting snow this week? ​Be sure to head to your local Ariens dealer to check out this year's new Sno-Thro models.​ Don't be stuck shoveling this year. Click here​ to see our current snow promotions, and click here​ to locate your nearest authorized dealer. ​